FIG Commission 6 - Engineering Surveys

Work Plan 2019-2022

Original work plan in .pdf format

Terms of Reference

  • Design of accurate, robust and reliable surveying systems to be applied to at construction sites or for monitoring proposes.
  • Validation of surveying equipment
  • Quality control of measured data Acquisition of static and/or dynamic data for better understanding the behaviour of structures
  • Creation and maintenance of integrated geospatial information systems for engineering applications
  • Improvement of advanced statistical and non-statistical methods to derive reliable information on displacements of structures and natural objects
  • Improvement of advanced statistical methods to derive reliable information on displacements of structures and natural objects
  • Increase the use of aerial and terrestrial photogrammetric techniques in construction sites, visual inspections and displacements monitoring
  • Integration of multi-sensor systems and data
  • Implementation of automated surveying systems
  • Contribution with spatial data for BIM, 3D and 4D visualizations, collaborative virtual environments and augmented reality

Mission Statement

The mission of Commission 6 is to:

  • Assist the engineering surveyors to have privileged access to the newest knowledge, either in the technology domain or the analysis techniques and methods
  • Encourage the development of guidelines and good practices
  • Disseminate the benefits arising from the newest engineering surveying techniques among other professionals
  • Promote interdisciplinary forums for the exchange of knowledge
  • Participate in FIG organizations and cooperate with other FIG Commissions as with FIG Networks
  • Cooperate with sister organizations, primarily the IAG and ISPRS, including the organization of joint events

General

Nowadays we are experiencing a period of paradigm shifts, several motivated by awareness of the limitations of our planet. Our world is becoming less and less stable. The number of big disasters, whether natural or resulting from human activity (earthquakes, landslides, land subsidence, climate change consequences, etc.) is increasing. Severe weather conditions together with inadequate human interventions on the earth surface, as well as with an increase of inhabitants in several areas of the globe, are leading to a need of engineering surveys in pre, during and post disasters.

In the domain of civil engineering, rehabilitation is the new rule and sustainability in construction is an undeniable demand. Even if 2D mapping is still needed and current practise, engineers and architects look for 3D in all phases, from the design, to the construction, and throughout the operation phase. Several demand 4D models now, integrating data from several sources, sometimes in real (or quasi real) time.

The challenges are increasing. New techniques and requests in new areas of work are challenging the engineering surveyors. FIG Commission 6 will work together with engineering surveyors to provide them information about equipment and methods that will increase their expertise, making them even more valuable professionals.

Working Groups

Working Group 6.1 – Deformation Monitoring and Analysis

Policy Issues

Deformation studies in Engineering Surveying are based on a broad knowledge of suitable sensors and their potential, modern data storage and communication solutions and advanced processing and analysis methods. Additionally, a thorough understanding of the behaviour of monitoring objects and processes (e.g., large scale structure or landslide effected area), is essential to set-up and operate an optimum monitoring system. Nowadays deformation tasks are more and more oriented towards real-time, multi-sensor systems, which require automation of data capture and new concepts in data processing, analysis and interpretation. WG6.1’s main goals will be to support specialists in deformation studies with state-of-the art solutions and provide latest developments and future oriented concepts:

  • Promoting studies on the potential of existing and new sensors to determine geometric deformation quantities from surveying and adjacent fields;
  • Promoting the development of concepts for automated data storage, data transfer and data pre-processing;
  • Promoting the adaptation of numerical algorithms to derive relevant deformation quantities in real-time, including concepts from time series analysis;
  • Promoting a multidisciplinary collaboration between surveying, structural and geotechnical engineers to understand the behaviour of structures and geotechnical objects;
  • Study of most modern concepts for data analysis like artificial neural networks, fuzzy logics and generic algorithms;
  • Investigate and adopt as required modern analysis techniques (Big Data, IoT, etc.) to cope with large volume data arising from large number of low-cost sensors;
  • Study the issues and investigate the challenges arising for using Unmanned Arial Vehicles (UAVs) for deformation monitoring;
  • Initiate investigations to extend the range of deformation studies to higher frequencies, which are important in Structural Health Monitoring, i.e. to be able to study oscillations and vibrations and their effects on critical structures;

Chair

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Niemeier
w.niemeier[at]tu-bs.de

Prof. Dr. Vassilis Gikas

 

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Working Group 6.2 – Landslides Monitoring

Policy Issues

Landslides, debris flows and rockfalls can endanger inhabitants and infrastructures. If we focus on landslides, they have an important societal impact in many mountainous, hilly and coastal regions in the world. Landslide failures may seriously damage the human and environmental resources of a region. However, it is still uneasy to forecast the evolution of a landslide because it depends both on its dynamics and on external triggering events, such as earthquakes and rainfall. This is why monitoring is essential to learn more on the physical processes controlling their movement (failure, propagation) and to attempt to predict their behaviour in time and space. Innovative investigation, monitoring and mapping techniques are being developed in order to improve the methods for local and regional landslide hazard assessment and/or the design of early warning systems.

WG6.2’s main goals will be to support specialists in landslides monitoring studies with state-ofthe art solutions and provide latest developments and future oriented concepts:

  • Promoting studies on the potential of existing and new sensors to determine geometric deformation quantities from surveying and adjacent fields (remote sensing, seismology, meteorology, hydrology and geochemistry);
  • Promoting the development of concepts for automated data storage, data transfer and data pre-processing;
  • Promoting the adaptation of numerical algorithms to derive relevant deformation quantities in real-time, including concepts from time series analysis;
  • Promoting a multidisciplinary collaboration between surveying, geological, geophysical and geotechnical engineers to understand the behaviour of landslides;
  • Study of most modern concepts for data analysis like artificial neural networks, fuzzy logics and generic algorithms; • Investigate and adopt as required modern analysis techniques (Big Data, IoT, etc.) to cope with large volume data arising from large number of low-cost sensors;
  • Study the issues and investigate the challenges arising for using Unmanned Arial Vehicles (UAVs) for deformation monitoring;

Chair

Associate Prof. Dr. Gilbert Ferhat
gilbert.ferhat[at]unistra.fr

 

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Working Group 6.3 - UAV in Surveying

Chair

Hans Ni, China

 

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